Artist Statement

The themes of fragility, metamorphosis and survival are central to my work, which can be viewed as a continuum from personal to world issues. The determination of nature and humankind to overcome adversity, is at the core of my investigations. Into my work I weave personal narratives to illustrate how we cope with trauma, disease and recovery. This has led to explorations into sexual transitioning, cancer treatments and facing death. On a more global scale I am looking at the effects of environmental stresses – climate change above all – and our patterns of living and consumption.  Individual works and installations employ a strong narrative content. Through sight, sound and touch, I wish to facilitate an exchange, a dialogue with the viewer, encouraging a deeper involvement with the subject, enabling contemplation on the human condition, how we are not one, but have a wider impact on the biosphere.  Concepts of metamorphosis and transience extend to the artworks I produce. Having a highly process-led approach I manipulate a wide range of materials, juxta-positioning traditional art methods with industrial. Organic (wood, pathology specimens, human tissue) may be combined with natural pigments, ink, charcoal, metal powders. And these are encouraged to mutate - corrode, oxidize, shrink and weep all working together, or by repelling, to create fragility and change in the resulting piece. Often these works are placed in installations which are enhanced with sound and collected narratives.  Alongside my exploration of the personal condition, our environmental impact is being scrutinized through a year-long collaboration with my fellow art and science colleague, Hannah Scott. In this partnership we are considering the impact of plastics in the oceans, the changing levels of the sea and its consequence, erosion and change to landscapes and the personal impact of consumption patterns. Hannah has been visiting distribution sites in the UK and voyaging on a cargo ship, whilst I have been gathering supporting data and observations and journeying to the UK coastlines, wetlands and ports and further afield to Iceland to witness erosion and the effects of waste deposits.  With thanks to: The Gordon Museum of Pathology, Kings College Laboratories and Dr.Billy Leung.

The themes of fragility, metamorphosis and survival are central to my work, which can be viewed as a continuum from personal to world issues. The determination of nature and humankind to overcome adversity, is at the core of my investigations. Into my work I weave personal narratives to illustrate how we cope with trauma, disease and recovery. This has led to explorations into sexual transitioning, cancer treatments and facing death. On a more global scale I am looking at the effects of environmental stresses – climate change above all – and our patterns of living and consumption.

Individual works and installations employ a strong narrative content. Through sight, sound and touch, I wish to facilitate an exchange, a dialogue with the viewer, encouraging a deeper involvement with the subject, enabling contemplation on the human condition, how we are not one, but have a wider impact on the biosphere.

Concepts of metamorphosis and transience extend to the artworks I produce. Having a highly process-led approach I manipulate a wide range of materials, juxta-positioning traditional art methods with industrial. Organic (wood, pathology specimens, human tissue) may be combined with natural pigments, ink, charcoal, metal powders. And these are encouraged to mutate - corrode, oxidize, shrink and weep all working together, or by repelling, to create fragility and change in the resulting piece. Often these works are placed in installations which are enhanced with sound and collected narratives.

Alongside my exploration of the personal condition, our environmental impact is being scrutinized through a year-long collaboration with my fellow art and science colleague, Hannah Scott. In this partnership we are considering the impact of plastics in the oceans, the changing levels of the sea and its consequence, erosion and change to landscapes and the personal impact of consumption patterns. Hannah has been visiting distribution sites in the UK and voyaging on a cargo ship, whilst I have been gathering supporting data and observations and journeying to the UK coastlines, wetlands and ports and further afield to Iceland to witness erosion and the effects of waste deposits.

With thanks to: The Gordon Museum of Pathology, Kings College Laboratories and Dr.Billy Leung.